Uncontested Divorce in New Mexico

Learn how to obtain an uncontested divorce in New Mexico

Ending a marriage can be a difficult and stressful time in a person’s life - confusing court proceedings only add to the stress. When you or your spouse don’t agree on your divorce-related issues, also knows as “contesting” the divorce, the process is long, adversarial and expensive. However, if you and your spouse can agree on all of the issues required to end your marriage, you may be able to file an "uncontested" divorce in New Mexico, which can save you stress, time and money.

This article covers the basics of an uncontested divorce and explains how to get one in New Mexico. If you have questions after reading this article, it’s a good idea to speak with a New Mexico divorce attorney.

Contested Versus Uncontested Divorce

When you and your spouse don’t agree about either ending the marriage or how to settle all of the issues involved in ending a marriage, the divorce is “contested.” For a contested divorce, both you and your spouse will usually need lawyers, there will be multiple court appearances and possibly a trial before the judge decides the contested issues and grants you and your spouse a divorce.

In contrast, an “uncontested divorce” is available in New Mexico when you and your spouse agree that the marriage should end and how to settle all of your divorce issues, like property division, alimony, custody and child support. An uncontested divorce is usually much faster and cheaper than a contested divorce because you don’t have any disputes for the judge to decide.

In New Mexico, a divorce is also called a “dissolution.” The laws and paperwork you will need to fill out and file may use either or both terms, so don’t be confused.

Divorce Requirements in New Mexico

To be able to file for an uncontested divorce in New Mexico, both you and your spouse must agree on the following issues:

  • that you want to end your marriage because you and your spouse can’t get along anymore and it’s unlikely that you will get back together (what New Mexico law calls an “incompatibility”)
  • how to divide all marital property and debt, and
  • how much spousal maintenance (also known as alimony) with be paid, if any.

If you and your spouse have children together and your children are under age 18, you and your spouse must also agree on:

  • the parenting plan, which includes who will have legal and physical custody as well as a visitation schedule, and
  • child support.

Furthermore, either you or your spouse must have lived in New Mexico for at least the six months immediately before you file for divorce and one of you must be “domiciled” in New Mexico. “Domiciled” means that you live in New Mexico and intend to stay living in New Mexico for the foreseeable future. If you have children together, the children must have lived in New Mexico for at least the last six months and must currently live in New Mexico.

How to Obtain an Uncontested Divorce in New Mexico

The process of obtaining an uncontested divorce in New Mexico requires the filing of different forms depending on whether you and your spouse have children under the age of 18 together. The New Mexico Supreme Court provides all of the forms required for an uncontested divorce here.

If you do not have children with your spouse, you will file all of the forms included in the Dissolution Without Children Packet, provided by the New Mexico Supreme Court. The packet includes instructions and all of the forms needed to proceed with a basic uncontested divorce without children.

If you and your spouse have children under the age of 18 together, you will file all of the forms included in theDissolution With Children Packet, provided by the New Mexico Supreme Court. The packet includes instructions and all of the forms needed to proceed with a basic uncontested divorce with children.

Regardless of whether you have children with your spouse or not, the process to start an uncontested divorce is the same. First, you have to fill out the following forms:

  • “Domestic Relations Cover and Information Sheet” (Form 4A-101 NMRA): This form requests basic information about you, your spouse, and any children you have.
  • “Petition for Dissolution of Marriage:” If you and your spouse do not have children together, you will file the Form 4A-102 NMRA. If you and your spouse have children under age 18 together, you will file Form 4A-103 NMRA. The Petition is where you request the Court to grant you a divorce.
  • “Summons” (Form 4-206NMRA): the Summons is used to notify your spouse about the divorce proceeding and gives your spouse instructions about how to respond.

Once completed, you must file these papers with the Court Clerk at the Supreme Court in the judicial district in which you or your spouse lives. When you file, you have to pay a filing fee. If you can’t afford it, you can file an application to have the Court waive the fee. (Form 4-222 NMRA).

When you file your paperwork, the Court Clerk will sign and stamp the summons and give it back to you with a copy of your Petition. Next, you have to serve your spouse with the Petition and Summons.

To properly serve your spouse, someone other than you over the age of 18, must hand-deliver the papers to your spouse or you can mail your paperwork to your spouse by certified mail. If you have someone hand deliver the papers, then that person must complete and sign an affidavit (written declaration) of service, which you then must file with the Court. If you choose to use serve by mail, your spouse must sign the receipt indicating receipt of the paperwork and send it back to you for filing with the Court.

The next step to secure an uncontested divorce in New Mexico is to complete and file a Marital Settlement Agreement (Form 4A-301 NMRA). The Marital Settlement Agreement describes how you and your spouse have agreed to divide property and debts and whether one of you will pay spousal support, and if so, how much. If you and your spouse have minor children together, you also have to file the Custody Plan (Form 4A-302 NMRA) and the Child Support Obligation (Form 4A-303 NMRA).

If you’re having problems coming to an agreement with your spouse, you can request the assistance of a mediator if the judicial district in which you have filed has a mediation program. If you need help settling child support or other financial issues, file Form 4A-205 NMRA. If you need the help of a mediator for the issues of custody and time sharing of your children, file Form 4A-204 NMRA.

Once you and your spouse have agreed on all issues and have completed and signed a Marital Settlement Agreement in front of a notary, you must submit the agreement along with a completed Final Decree of Dissolution of Marriage (Form 4A-305 NMRA) to the court for approval. The court will review your paperwork and, if approved, the judge will sign the Final Decree, making your divorce official and the terms of your Marital Settlement Agreement binding on both you and your spouse, just like a contract.

Resources

For the full text of the laws governing divorce in New Mexico, see N.M.S.A. §§ 40-4-1 through 40-4-6.

Talk to a Lawyer

Want to talk to an attorney? Start here.

How It Works

  1. Briefly tell us about your case
  2. Provide your contact information
  3. Connect with local attorneys
NOLO-web3:DRU1.6.12.2.20161011.41205